Commission Information

DANIELLE GELHORN

ARTWORK

Pricing

8X10           $300

 

9X12           $400

 

12X12         $500*

 

11X14         $500*

 

16X20         $750*

Prices are in Canadian funds and do not include matting, framing, or shipping.

 

Prices are based on one subject with no background. Secondary and tertiary subjects and backgrounds are available -- price to be discussed.

Custom sizes are available.

 

25% deposit is due at time of order, please leave 8 weeks for completion of drawing. Balance is due at completion of piece (pending your approval).

 

*Price includes complentary second subject (horse or rider).

 

 

 

    If you are interested in having an original portrait created, you must provide an ideal image for me to work from. I take pride in drawing the best representation of your horse  possible. All horses have unique bone structure, markings and personality, so the best drawings come from photos which represent your horse most accurately. If the photo is out of focus or if the lighting includes heavy shadowing, I have to invent what cannot be seen clearly. It is best to provide multiple photos of your horse so I may develop a better understanding its characterisitics -- just be clear about which one you would like drawn.

   All reference photos provided must be taken by yourself or you must obtain written permission from the photographer for me to draw from their photograph.

 

Tips for reference photos:

 

   -  Select a photo that is in focus, with the subject's eyes open and ears forward!

   -  High resolution photos provide greater detail to work from and therefore a more accurate portrait. Try to use the best quality camera available to you, and fill the frame as much as possible with the subject's head/shoulders. Also e-mail the original file size (avoid downsizing).

   -  Lighting is very important: if possible, take the photo outdoors. Try to avoid heavy shadowing, but some shadows/shine make for a more interesting likeness. Images with both very dark and very light sections make for the most dynamic works.

 

Above is an example of a beautiful colour picture of my horse Rogue I took riding at Campbell Valley Park. However, once the image is converted to black and white, Rogue is mostly a medium gray, which would result in a dull drawing.

The image on the left is an ideal photo: the image is in focus, the eyes and ears are engaged, and the photo is close-up to the subject. There are no large shadows casting over entire portions of the horse, but there are shadows that accentuate features, adding more detail. The image on the right is the finished drawing.